Página 17 dos resultados de 45945 itens digitais encontrados em 0.036 segundos

‣ Cytochrome c release and mitochondria involvement in programmed cell death induced by acetic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Ludovico, Paula; Rodrigues, Fernando José dos Santos; Almeida, A. J.; Silva, Manuel T.; Barrientos, Antoni; Côrte-Real, Manuela
Fonte: American Society for Cell Biology. Publicador: American Society for Cell Biology.
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /08/2002 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
539.15195%
Evidence is presented that mitochondria are implicated in the previously described programmed cell death (PCD) process induced by acetic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In yeast cells undergoing a PCD process induced by acetic acid, translocation of cytochrome c (CytC) to the cytosol and reactive oxygen species production, two events known to be proapoptotic in mammals, were observed. Associated with these events, reduction in oxygen consumption and in mitochondrial membrane potential was found. Enzymatic assays showed that the activity of complex bc1 was normal, whereas that of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) was strongly decreased. This decrease is in accordance with the observed reduction in the amounts of COX II subunit and of cytochromes a+a3. The acetic acid-induced PCD process was found to be independent of oxidative phosphorylation because it was not inhibited by oligomycin treatment. The inability of S. cerevisiae mutant strains (lacking mitochondrial DNA, heme lyase, or ATPase) to undergo acetic acid-induced PCD and in the ATPase mutant (knockout in ATP10) the absence of CytC release provides further evidence that the process is mediated by a mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway. The understanding of the involvement of a mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway in S. cerevisiae PCD process will be most useful in the further elucidation of an ancestral pathway common to PCD in metazoans.; Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT) - PRAXIS XXI.; Muscular Dystrophy Association – grant MDACU01991001.

‣ Open source bioimage informatics for cell biology

Swedlow, Jason R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.
Fonte: Elsevier Science Publishers Publicador: Elsevier Science Publishers
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /11/2009 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
455.66492%
Significant technical advances in imaging, molecular biology and genomics have fueled a revolution in cell biology, in that the molecular and structural processes of the cell are now visualized and measured routinely. Driving much of this recent development has been the advent of computational tools for the acquisition, visualization, analysis and dissemination of these datasets. These tools collectively make up a new subfield of computational biology called bioimage informatics, which is facilitated by open source approaches. We discuss why open source tools for image informatics in cell biology are needed, some of the key general attributes of what make an open source imaging application successful, and point to opportunities for further operability that should greatly accelerate future cell biology discovery.

‣ History of the Department of Cell Biology at Yale School of Medicine, 1813-2010

Lentz, Thomas L.
Fonte: YJBM Publicador: YJBM
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
457.7575%
The Department of Cell Biology at the Yale University School of Medicine was established in 1983. It was preceded by the Section of Cell Biology, which was formed in 1973 when George E. Palade and collaborators came to Yale from the Rockefeller University. Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813. This article reviews the history of the Department of Anatomy at Yale and its evolution into Cell Biology that began with the introduction of histology into the curriculum in the 1860s. The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described. Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided.

‣ C. elegans as a model for stem cell biology

Joshi, Pradeep M.; Riddle, Misty R.; Djabrayan, Nareg J.V.; Rothman, Joel H.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /05/2010 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
456.24785%
We review the application of C. elegans as a model system to understand key aspects of stem cell biology. The only bona fide stem cells in C. elegans are those of the germline, which serves as a valuable paradigm for understanding how stem cell niches influence maintenance and differentiation of stem cells and how somatic differentiation is repressed during germline development. Somatic cells that share stem cell-like characteristics also provide insights into principles in stem cell biology. The epidermalseam cell lineages lend clues to conserved mechanisms of self-renewal and expansion divisions. Principles of developmental plasticity and reprogramming relevant to stem cell biology arise from studies of natural transdifferentiation and from analysis of early embryonic progenitors, which undergo a dramatic transition from a pluripotent, reprogrammable condition to a state of committed differentiation. The relevance of these developmental processes to our understanding of stem cell biology in other organisms is discussed.

‣ A New Stem Cell Biology: The Continuum and Microvesicles

Quesenberry, Peter J.; Dooner, Mark S.; Goldberg, Laura R.; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pereira, Mandy; Amaral, Ashley; Del Tatto, Michael M.; Hixson, Douglas C.; Ramratnam, Bharat
Fonte: American Clinical and Climatological Association Publicador: American Clinical and Climatological Association
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2012 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
456.09688%
The hierarchical models of stem cell biology have been based on work first demonstrating pluripotental spleen-colony-forming units, then showing progenitors with many differentiation fates assayed in in vitro culture; there followed the definition and separation of “stem cells” using monoclonal antibodies to surface epitopes and fluorescent-activated cell characterization and sorting (FACS). These studies led to an elegant model of stem cell biology in which primitive dormant G0 stem cells with tremendous proliferative and differentiative potential gave rise to progressively more restricted and differentiated classes of stem/progenitor cells, and finally differentiated marrow hematopoietic cells. The holy grail of hematopoietic stem cell biology became the purification of the stem cell and the clonal definition of this cell. Most recently, the long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cell (LT-HSC) has been believed to be a lineage negative sca-1+C-kit+ Flk3- and CD150+ cell. However, a series of studies over the past 10 years has indicated that murine marrow stem cells continuously change phenotype with cell cycle passage. We present here studies using tritiated thymidine suicide and pyronin-Hoechst FACS separations indicating that the murine hematopoietic stem cell is a cycling cell. This would indicate that the hematopoietic stem cell must be continuously changing in phenotype and...

‣ Dissecting Social Cell Biology and Tumors Using Drosophila Genetics

Pastor-Pareja, José Carlos; Xu, Tian
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2013 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
457.6905%
Cancer was seen for a long time as a strictly cell-autonomous process in which oncogenes and tumor-suppressor mutations drive clonal cell expansions. Research in the past decade, however, paints a more integrative picture of communication and interplay between neighboring cells in tissues. It is increasingly clear as well that tumors, far from being homogenous lumps of cells, consist of different cell types that function together as complex tissue-level communities. The repertoire of interactive cell behaviors and the quantity of cellular players involved call for a social cell biology that investigates these interactions. Research into this social cell biology is critical for understanding development of normal and tumoral tissues. Such complex social cell biology interactions can be parsed in Drosophila. Techniques in Drosophila for analysis of gene function and clonal behavior allow us to generate tumors and dissect their complex interactive biology with cellular resolution. Here, we review recent Drosophila research aimed at understanding tissue-level biology and social cell interactions in tumors, highlighting the principles these studies reveal.

‣ Evolutionary cell biology: Two origins, one objective

Lynch, Michael; Field, Mark C.; Goodson, Holly V.; Malik, Harmit S.; Pereira-Leal, José B.; Roos, David S.; Turkewitz, Aaron P.; Sazer, Shelley
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
458.4092%
All aspects of biological diversification ultimately trace to evolutionary modifications at the cellular level. This central role of cells frames the basic questions as to how cells work and how cells come to be the way they are. Although these two lines of inquiry lie respectively within the traditional provenance of cell biology and evolutionary biology, a comprehensive synthesis of evolutionary and cell-biological thinking is lacking. We define evolutionary cell biology as the fusion of these two eponymous fields with the theoretical and quantitative branches of biochemistry, biophysics, and population genetics. The key goals are to develop a mechanistic understanding of general evolutionary processes, while specifically infusing cell biology with an evolutionary perspective. The full development of this interdisciplinary field has the potential to solve numerous problems in diverse areas of biology, including the degree to which selection, effectively neutral processes, historical contingencies, and/or constraints at the chemical and biophysical levels dictate patterns of variation for intracellular features. These problems can now be examined at both the within- and among-species levels, with single-cell methodologies even allowing quantification of variation within genotypes. Some results from this emerging field have already had a substantial impact on cell biology...

‣ Cell Encapsulation in Sub-mm Sized Gel Modules Using Replica Molding

McGuigan, Alison P.; Butte, Manish; Whitesides, George; Bruzewicz, Derek A.; Glavan, Ana
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
454.7228%
For many types of cells, behavior in two-dimensional (2D) culture differs from that in three-dimensional (3D) culture. Among biologists, 2D culture on treated plastic surfaces is currently the most popular method for cell culture. In 3D, no analogous standard method—one that is similarly convenient, flexible, and reproducible—exists. This paper describes a soft-lithographic method to encapsulate cells in 3D gel objects (modules) in a variety of simple shapes (cylinders, crosses, rectangular prisms) with lateral dimensions between 40 and 1000 ?m, cell densities of 105 – 108 cells/cm3, and total volumes between 1×10?7 and 8×10?4 cm3. By varying (i) the initial density of cells at seeding, and (ii) the dimensions of the modules, the number of cells per module ranged from 1 to 2500 cells. Modules were formed from a range of standard biopolymers, including collagen, Matrigel™, and agarose, without the complex equipment often used in encapsulation. The small dimensions of the modules allowed rapid transport of nutrients by diffusion to cells at any location in the module, and therefore allowed generation of modules with cell densities near to those of dense tissues (108 – 109 cells/cm3). This modular method is based on soft lithography and requires little special equipment; the method is therefore accessible...

‣ IQGAP1-Dependent Signaling Pathway Regulates Endothelial Cell Proliferation and Angiogenesis

Meyer, Rosana D.; Rahimi, Nader; Sacks, David Barry
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
455.82332%
Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) signaling is an obligate requirement for normal development and pathological angiogenesis such as cancer and age-related macular degeneration. Although autophosphorylation of tyrosine 1173 (Y1173) of VEGFR-2 is considered a focal point for its angiogenic signal relay, however, the mechanism of phosphorylation of Y1173, signaling proteins that are recruited to this residue and their role in angiogenesis is not fully understood. Methodology/Principal Findings: In this study we demonstrate that c-Src kinase directly through its Src homology 2 (SH2) domain and indirectly via c-Cbl binds to phospho-Y1057 of VEGFR-2. Activation of c-Src kinase by a positive feedback mechanism phosphorylates VEGFR-2 at multi-docking site, Y1173. c-Src also catalyzes tyrosine phosphorylation of IQGAP1 and acts as an adaptor to bridge IQGAP1 to VEGFR-2. In turn, IQGAP1 activates b-Raf and mediates proliferation of endothelial cells. Silencing expression of IQGAP1 and b-Raf revealed that their activity is essential for VEGF to stimulate angiogenesis in an in vivo angiogenesis model of chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Conclusions/Significance: Angiogenesis contributes to the pathology of numerous human diseases ranging from cancer to age-related macular degeneration. Determining molecular mechanism of tyrosine phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 and identification of molecules that are relaying its angiogenic signaling may identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention against angiogenesis-associated diseases. Our study shows that recruitment and activation of c-Src by VEGFR-2 plays a pivotal role in relaying angiogenic signaling of VEGFR-2; it phosphorylates VEGFR-2 at Y1173...

‣ The Therapeutic Implications of Plasticity of the Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype

Leder, Kevin; Holland, Eric C.; Michor, Franziska L.
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
454.7228%
The cancer stem cell hypothesis suggests that tumors contain a small population of cancer cells that have the ability to undergo symmetric self-renewing cell division. In tumors that follow this model, cancer stem cells produce various kinds of specified precursors that divide a limited number of times before terminally differentiating or undergoing apoptosis. As cells within the tumor mature, they become progressively more restricted in the cell types to which they can give rise. However, in some tumor types, the presence of certain extra- or intracellular signals can induce committed cancer progenitors to revert to a multipotential cancer stem cell state. In this paper, we design a novel mathematical model to investigate the dynamics of tumor progression in such situations, and study the implications of a reversible cancer stem cell phenotype for therapeutic interventions. We find that higher levels of dedifferentiation substantially reduce the effectiveness of therapy directed at cancer stem cells by leading to higher rates of resistance. We conclude that plasticity of the cancer stem cell phenotype is an important determinant of the prognosis of tumors. This model represents the first mathematical investigation of this tumor trait and contributes to a quantitative understanding of cancer.

‣ Order and Stochastic Dynamics in Drosophila Planar Cell Polarity

Shraiman, Boris I.; Burak, Yoram
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
455.66492%
Cells in the wing blade of Drosophila melanogaster exhibit an in-plane polarization causing distal orientation of hairs. Establishment of the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) involves intercellular interactions as well as a global orienting signal. Many of the genetic and molecular components underlying this process have been experimentally identified and a recently advanced system-level model has suggested that the observed mutant phenotypes can be understood in terms of intercellular interactions involving asymmetric localization of membrane bound proteins. Among key open questions in understanding the emergence of ordered polarization is the effect of stochasticity and the role of the global orienting signal. These issues relate closely to our understanding of ferromagnetism in physical systems. Here we pursue this analogy to understand the emergence of PCP order. To this end we develop a semi-phenomenological representation of the underlying molecular processes and define a “phase diagram” of the model which provides a global view of the dependence of the phenotype on parameters. We show that the dynamics of PCP has two regimes: rapid growth in the amplitude of local polarization followed by a slower process of alignment which progresses from small to large scales. We discuss the response of the tissue to various types of orienting signals and show that global PCP order can be achieved with a weak orienting signal provided that it acts during the early phase of the process. Finally we define and discuss some of the experimental predictions of the model.; Other Research Unit

‣ Chromatin States Accurately Classify Cell Differentiation Stages

Larson, Jessica Lynn; Yuan, Guocheng
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
455.0641%
Gene expression is controlled by the concerted interactions between transcription factors and chromatin regulators. While recent studies have identified global chromatin state changes across cell-types, it remains unclear to what extent these changes are co-regulated during cell-differentiation. Here we present a comprehensive computational analysis by assembling a large dataset containing genome-wide occupancy information of 5 histone modifications in 27 human cell lines (including 24 normal and 3 cancer cell lines) obtained from the public domain, followed by independent analysis at three different representations. We classified the differentiation stage of a cell-type based on its genome-wide pattern of chromatin states, and found that our method was able to identify normal cell lines with nearly 100% accuracy. We then applied our model to classify the cancer cell lines and found that each can be unequivocally classified as differentiated cells. The differences can be in part explained by the differential activities of three regulatory modules associated with embryonic stem cells. We also found that the “hotspot” genes, whose chromatin states change dynamically in accordance to the differentiation stage, are not randomly distributed across the genome but tend to be embedded in multi-gene chromatin domains...

‣ Exploring the Contextual Sensitivity of Factors that Determine Cell-to-Cell Variability in Receptor-Mediated Apoptosis

Spencer, Sabrina L.; Gaudet, Suzanne; Chen, William Wei-Lun; Sorger, Peter Karl
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
455.3444%
Stochastic fluctuations in gene expression give rise to cell-to-cell variability in protein levels which can potentially cause variability in cellular phenotype. For TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) variability manifests itself as dramatic differences in the time between ligand exposure and the sudden activation of the effector caspases that kill cells. However, the contribution of individual proteins to phenotypic variability has not been explored in detail. In this paper we use feature-based sensitivity analysis as a means to estimate the impact of variation in key apoptosis regulators on variability in the dynamics of cell death. We use Monte Carlo sampling from measured protein concentration distributions in combination with a previously validated ordinary differential equation model of apoptosis to simulate the dynamics of receptor-mediated apoptosis. We find that variation in the concentrations of some proteins matters much more than variation in others and that precisely which proteins matter depends both on the concentrations of other proteins and on whether correlations in protein levels are taken into account. A prediction from simulation that we confirm experimentally is that variability in fate is sensitive to even small increases in the levels of Bcl-2. We also show that sensitivity to Bcl-2 levels is itself sensitive to the levels of interacting proteins. The contextual dependency is implicit in the mathematical formulation of sensitivity...

‣ A conserved cell growth cycle can account for the environmental stress responses of divergent eukaryotes

Slavov, Nikolai; Airoldi, Edoardo Maria; van Oudenaarden, A.; Botstein, D.
Fonte: American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) Publicador: American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
541.40508%
The respiratory metabolic cycle in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) consists of two phases most simply defined phenomenologically: low oxygen consumption (LOC) and high oxygen consumption (HOC). Each phase is associated with the periodic expression of thousands of genes, producing oscillating patterns of gene-expression found in synchronized cultures and in single cells of slowly growing unsynchronized cultures. Systematic variation in the durations of the HOC and LOC phases can account quantitatively for well-studied transcriptional responses to growth rate differences. Here we show that a similar mechanism, transitions from the HOC phase to the LOC phase, can account for much of the common environmental stress response (ESR) and for the cross protection by a preliminary heat stress (or slow growth rate) to subsequent lethal heat-stress. Similar to the budding yeast metabolic cycle, we suggest that a metabolic cycle, coupled in a similar way to the ESR, in the distantly related fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and in human can explain gene-expression and respiratory patterns observed in these organisms. Although metabolic cycling is associated with the G0/G1 phase of the cell division cycle of slowly growing budding yeast...

‣ FAS-Based Cell Depletion Facilitates the Selective Isolation of Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

Warlich, Eva; Schambach, Axel; Lock, Dominik; Wedekind, Dirk; Glage, Silke; Eckardt, Dominik; Bosio, Andreas; Knöbel, Sebastian
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
455.3444%
Cellular reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) opens up new avenues for basic research and regenerative medicine. However, the low efficiency of the procedure remains a major limitation. To identify iPSC, many studies to date relied on the activation of pluripotency-associated transcription factors. Such strategies are either retrospective or depend on genetically modified reporter cells. We aimed at identifying naturally occurring surface proteins in a systematic approach, focusing on antibody-targeted markers to enable live-cell identification and selective isolation. We tested 170 antibodies for differential expression between mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and mouse pluripotent stem cells (PSC). Differentially expressed markers were evaluated for their ability to identify and isolate iPSC in reprogramming cultures. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EPCAM) and stage-specific embryonic antigen 1 (SSEA1) were upregulated early during reprogramming and enabled enrichment of OCT4 expressing cells by magnetic cell sorting. Downregulation of somatic marker FAS was equally suitable to enrich OCT4 expressing cells, which has not been described so far. Furthermore, FAS downregulation correlated with viral transgene silencing. Finally...

‣ USP9X Enhances the Polarity and Self-Renewal of Embryonic Stem Cell-derived Neural Progenitors

Jolly, L.; Taylor, V.; Wood, S.
Fonte: Amer Soc Cell Biology Publicador: Amer Soc Cell Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2009 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
542.17082%
The substrate-specific deubiquitylating enzyme USP9X is a putative “stemness” gene expressed in many progenitor cell populations. To test its function in embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor/stem cells, we expressed USP9X from a Nestin promoter. Elevated USP9X levels resulted in two phenomena. First, it produced a dramatically altered cellular architecture wherein the majority (>80%) of neural progenitors was arranged into radial clusters. These progenitors expressed markers of radial glial cells and were highly polarized with adherens junction proteins (N-cadherin, -catenin, and AF-6) and apical markers (Prominin1, atypical protein kinase C-) as well as Notch, Numb, and USP9X itself, concentrated at the center. The cluster centers were also devoid of nuclei and so resembled the apical end-feet of radial progenitors in the neural tube. Second, USP9X overexpression caused a fivefold increase in the number of radial progenitors and neurons, in the absence of exogenous growth factors. 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine labeling, as well as the examination of the brain lipid-binding protein:III-tubulin ratio, indicated that nestin-USP9X enhanced the self-renewal of radial progenitors but did not block their subsequent differentiation to neurons and astrocytes. nestin-USP9X radial progenitors reformed clusters after passage as single cells...

‣ Identification of Wilms' Tumor 1-associating Protein Complex and Its Role in Alternative Splicing and the Cell Cycle*

Horiuchi, Keiko; Kawamura, Takeshi; Iwanari, Hiroko; Ohashi, Riuko; Naito, Makoto; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Hamakubo, Takao
Fonte: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Publicador: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
544.6695%
Background: WTAP is a ubiquitously expressed nuclear protein that is required for mammalian early embryo development and cell cycle progression.

‣ MARIS: Method for Analyzing RNA following Intracellular Sorting

Hrvatin, Siniša; Deng, Francis; O'Donnell, Charles W.; Gifford, David K.; Melton, Douglas A.
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
456.3823%
Transcriptional profiling is a key technique in the study of cell biology that is limited by the availability of reagents to uniquely identify specific cell types and isolate high quality RNA from them. We report a Method for Analyzing RNA following Intracellular Sorting (MARIS) that generates high quality RNA for transcriptome profiling following cellular fixation, intracellular immunofluorescent staining and FACS. MARIS can therefore be used to isolate high quality RNA from many otherwise inaccessible cell types simply based on immunofluorescent tagging of unique intracellular proteins. As proof of principle, we isolate RNA from sorted human embryonic stem cell-derived insulin-expressing cells as well as adult human β cells. MARIS is a basic molecular biology technique that could be used across several biological disciplines.

‣ Stochasticity and order: studies of keratinocyte proliferation

Roshan, Amit
Fonte: University of Cambridge; Medical Research Council (Great Britain). Cancer Unit. Publicador: University of Cambridge; Medical Research Council (Great Britain). Cancer Unit.
Tipo: Thesis; doctoral; PhD
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
455.3444%
A central tenet of stem cell biology has been that proliferating tissues are maintained through a cellular hierarchy comprising of self-renewing stem cells at the apex, multiple lineage-restricted short-lived progenitor cells, and post-mitotic differentiated cells. The wide range of colony sizes in cultured human keratinocytes has been taken to support this hypothesis. Contrary to this model, researchers using genetic lineage tracing in mouse epidermis have inferred a single progenitor population for homeostasis, and a quiescent stem cell population activated upon wounding or genetic mutation. To study the proliferative behaviour of human keratinocytes, I used live imaging in vitro at single cell resolution. This shows two modes of proliferation: Type 1 cell division is stochastic with equal odds of generating dividing or non-dividing progeny, while Type 2 cell division predominantly produces two dividing daughters. These two modes are sufficient to explain the entire range of colony sizes seen after 7-12 days of culture and does not require a spectrum of proliferative ability. This insight provides a simple way to study the effects of external factors on cell fate. To exemplify this, I observed the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and the Wnt agonist R-spondin on proliferation. Here I find proliferation in type 2 colonies changes by changing the proportion of cells dividing. This has implications for the limited success of EGF therapies in clinical trials following burns. To examine clonal contributions to wound repair...

‣ The PTK7 and ROR2 Protein Receptors Interact in the Vertebrate WNT/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) Pathway*

Martinez, Sébastien; Scerbo, Pierluigi; Giordano, Marilyn; Daulat, Avais M.; Lhoumeau, Anne-Catherine; Thomé, Virginie; Kodjabachian, Laurent; Borg, Jean-Paul
Fonte: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Publicador: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Tipo: Text
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
544.6695%
Background: The planar cell polarity pathway plays important roles in morphogenetic processes.