Página 1 dos resultados de 23 itens digitais encontrados em 0.001 segundos

‣ Efficacy of the d-phenothrin/pyriproxyfen association against mites in naturally co-infested rabbits

Fernandes,Julio I.; Verocai,Guilherme G.; Ribeiro,Francisco A.; Melo,Raquel M.P.S.; Correia,Thaís R.; Coumendouros,Katherina; Scott,Fabio B.
Fonte: Colégio Brasileiro de Patologia Animal - CBPA; Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária (EMBRAPA) Publicador: Colégio Brasileiro de Patologia Animal - CBPA; Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária (EMBRAPA)
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/05/2013 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.617336%
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the d-phenothrin/pyriproxyfen association against Psoroptes ovis, Cheyletiella parasitivorax, and Leporacarus gibbus infestations in naturally co-infested rabbits. Twenty crossbreed (New Zealand White x California) rabbits concurrently infested by the three mite species were randomly divided in two groups. All rabbits presented with hyperemia, erythema and formation of crusts in the ear canals caused by P. ovis. Infestations by both C. parasitivorax and L. gibbus were considered asymptomatic in all animals.Ten animals were treated with a 4.4% d-phenothrin and 0.148% pyriproxyfen spray formulation until have their body surface uniformly sprayed, including external ear canals. The other ten rabbits remained untreated, serving as control group. Observations were done on days +7, +14, +21, +28, and +35 post-treatment. The d-phenothrin/pyriproxyfen association showed 100% efficacy against the three mite species and was responsible for the remission of psoroptic mange lesions on treated animals. No signs of intoxication were observed. The results indicate that d-phenothrin/pyriproxyfen spray formulation in a single application is an effective and clinically safe option for the control of different mite infestations in rabbits.

‣ Immune response to flour and dust mites in a United Kingdom bakery.

Tee, R D; Gordon, D J; Gordon, S; Crook, B; Nunn, A J; Musk, A W; Venables, K M; Taylor, A J
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /08/1992 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
28.28971%
In a study of 279 United Kingdom bakery workers a high prevalence of immunological response to storage mites was found. To determine whether this was the consequence of exposure to storage mites in bakery work, a population of salt packing workers was examined as a comparison group not at occupational risk of exposure to storage mites. Forty two per cent of both groups were atopic (had a positive skin prick response greater than negative controls to D pteronyssinus, grass pollen, or cat fur by 2 mm or more) and 33% had an immediate skin prick test response to at least one of four storage mites (L destructor, G domesticus, T putrescentiae, A Siro). A higher percentage of the salt packing workers than the bakery workers had a positive radioallergosorbent test (RAST) (greater than or equal to 0.35 PRU) to D pteronyssinus and to the four storage mites. Logistic regression analysis identified atopy as the most significant variable for a positive skin test and RAST response to storage mites in both groups of workers. RAST inhibition was used to analyse extracted area and personal air samples. Analysis of static area samples for aeroallergen showed immunological identity with flour but L destructor was found in only one of seven exposed filters. The concentration of airborne flour was related to exposure rank of perceived dustiness and gravimetric measurement of total dust. Nineteen out of 32 filters from workers in jobs with higher dust exposure (rank >/=6) had a level of > 10 microgram/m(3) flour whereas this concentrations was exceeded in only one of 23 filters from workers in low dust exposure (< rank 6). It is concluded that storage mites are not of special significance in allergic responses in bakery workers. The development of immunological (and airway) responsiveness to inhaled flour dust is increased in those exposed to higher concentrations of airborne allergen...

‣ BALB/c mice resistant to Toxoplasma gondii infection proved to be highly susceptible when previously infected with Myocoptes musculinus fur mites

Welter, Áurea; Mineo, José Roberto; de Oliveira Silva, Deise Aparecida; Lourenço, Elaine Vicente; Ferro, Eloísa Amália Vieira; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; da Silva, Neide Maria
Fonte: Blackwell Publishing Ltd Publicador: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /10/2007 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.172%

‣ Use of Selamectin and Moxidectin in the Treatment of Mouse Fur Mites

Mook, Deborah M; Benjamin, Kimberly A
Fonte: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Publicador: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
38.363325%
A breeding colony consisting of 250 different strains of mice was treated with the topical acaricide selamectin for the mouse fur mite Myocoptes musculinus, with no apparent ill effect, suggesting that this drug is safe for use in mice. To further evaluate their efficacy in treating Myocoptes spp., we compared selamectin with another acaricide, moxidectin, in a controlled manner. Infested mice were treated with selamectin or moxidectin at the time of cage change, and a subset of mice was retreated 10 d later. Mice underwent routine cellophane tape examination of the pelage for 1 y. Although no adult mites were found in any group at 1 mo after treatment, egg casings were found in the selamectin treatment group as late as 6 mo after treatment, prompting concern about its effectiveness. Moxidectin used in combination with cage changing was effective in eradicating mites, with mice negative for traces of mites on cellophane tape examination of the pelage from months 2 through 12 after treatment.

‣ Treatment and Eradication of Murine Fur Mites: I. Toxicologic Evaluation of Ivermectin-Compounded Feed

Arbona, Rodolfo J Ricart; Lipman, Neil S; Riedel, Elyn R; Wolf, Felix R
Fonte: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Publicador: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.541162%
Fur mite outbreaks remain a persistent problem in laboratory mouse colonies. All currently published treatment methods are labor-intensive, expensive, or unreliable. During a recent outbreak with Myobia musculi and Myocoptes musculinus in a large colony (approximately 30,000 cages), we developed a feed-based treatment regime in which ivermectin was the active ingredient. Rodent feed was compounded with 3 different concentrations of ivermectin (12, 24, and 48 ppm) and γ-irradiated. Postcompounding analysis revealed loss of ivermectin during manufacturing, but the remaining drug was stable for at least 6 mo. In an 8-wk toxicity study in a C57BL/6NTac mouse breeding colony, ad-libitum feeding of the 3 diets yielded estimated doses of 1.3, 2.7, and 5.4 mg/kg. Adult mice lacked adverse clinical effects, except that 1 of the 144 mice in the 48-ppm group developed tremors and ataxia and was euthanized. No significant differences between doses were revealed by CBC, serum chemistry, body weight, or gross necropsy. Plasma drug concentrations plateaued at a dose-dependent level 7 to 10 d after initiation of treatment and decreased to undetectable levels 6 to 9 d after its discontinuation. Fertility of the P0 generation was unaffected. Pup mortality was higher in the 24- and 48-ppm groups...

‣ Treatment and Eradication of Murine Fur Mites: II. Diagnostic Considerations

Ricart Arbona, Rodolfo J; Lipman, Neil S; Wolf, Felix R
Fonte: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Publicador: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
48.81452%
Fur mites are a persistent problem in contemporary laboratory mouse colonies. We conducted several studies to evaluate fur mite diagnostic methodologies and interpretation of results. Retrospective analysis of test results from sentinel mice exposed to soiled bedding collected from colonies infested with Myobia musculi and Myocoptes musculinus revealed the skin scrape test to be more reliable than pelt examination, provided that both the head and dorsal thoracolumbar regions were sampled. To assess their diagnostic accuracy, 3 commercial laboratories were sent positive control slides containing mites, mite parts, or eggs in sets of slides containing diagnostic skin scrapings in varying ratios. Laboratory B correctly identified the positive control slide. Laboratory A identified 1 of 3 positive control slides, whereas laboratory C failed to identify both positive control slides submitted. To determine the time required for a mouse to shed its entire hair coat, fur of Crl:CD1(ICR), BALB/cAnNCrl, and Crl:CFW(SW) albino mice was dyed black and the presence of dyed fur evaluated monthly for 8 mo. Limited dyed hair was still present at 8 mo; therefore, finding eggs or egg casings many months after treatment cessation does not necessarily imply treatment failure. To evaluate the effectiveness of soiled bedding sentinels for detection of fur mites in a mite-infested colony...

‣ Treatment and Eradication of Murine Fur Mites: III. Treatment of a Large Mouse Colony with Ivermectin-Compounded Feed

Arbona, Rodolfo J Ricart; Lipman, Neil S; Wolf, Felix R
Fonte: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Publicador: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
48.976885%
We determined the efficacy of ivermectin-compounded feed against fur mites in mice and describe its use to eradicate mites in vivaria holding approximately 30,000 cages. C57BL/6NCrl mice infested with Myobia musculi and Myocoptes musculinus were treated with ivermectin-compounded feed (approximate ingested dose, 1.3 mg/kg) for 1, 4, or 8 consecutive weeks. Regardless of treatment duration, all treated mice, as well as contact sentinels, remained free of fur mites for as long as 21 wk after treatment. No adverse effects were observed. Subsequently, facility-wide treatment was implemented in an attempt to eradicate fur mites from 3 vivaria housing approximately 120,000 mice. Medicated feed was provided for 8 wk to ensure that all cages and mice were treated. A single investigative group reported adverse effects in their colony 4 wk after treatment was initiated; mortality was attributed to ivermectin toxicity after an intracranial injection at 1 d of age. Naïve pups were unaffected. No other adverse effects were noted. Approximately 14,500 skin scrape samples were evaluated during the 12-mo posttreatment surveillance period. All samples were negative for mites. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful eradication of fur mites from a mouse colony of this large size.

‣ Soiled Bedding Sentinels for the Detection of Fur Mites in Mice

Lindstrom, Krista E; Carbone, Larry G; Kellar, Danielle E; Mayorga, Melinda S; Wilkerson, James D
Fonte: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Publicador: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
48.74944%
Identification and eradication of murine fur mite infestations are ongoing challenges faced by many research institutions. Infestations with Myobia musculi and Myocoptes musculinus can lead to animal health problems and may impose unwanted research variables by affecting the immune and physiologic functions of mice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility and efficacy of soiled bedding sentinels in the detection of fur mite infestations in colony mice. Female young-adult CRL:CD1(ICR) mice (n = 140) were exposed over a 12-wk period to various volume percentages of soiled bedding (11%, 20%, 50%, and 100%) from fur-mite–infested animals. Mice were tested every 2 wk with the cellophane tape test to identify the presence of fur mite adults and eggs. At the end of 12 wk, all mice exposed to 11%, 20%, and 50% soiled bedding tested negative for fur mites. One of the 35 mice (3%) receiving 100% soiled bedding tested positive for fur mites at the end of the 12-wk follow-up period. These findings suggest that the use of soiled bedding sentinels for the detection of fur mite infestations in colony mice is unreliable.

‣ Effect of Sampling Strategy on the Detection of Fur Mites within a Naturally Infested Colony of Mice (Mus musculus)

Pate, Kelly A Metcalf; Rice, Kelly A; Wrighten, Roberta; Watson, Julie
Fonte: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Publicador: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
48.799883%
Fur mites are one of the most common ectoparasites of laboratory mice and traditionally are diagnosed through surveillance of individual colony animals. Although multiple diagnostic modalities exist, few recommendations suggest optimal testing methods, target colony populations, or sampling sites. We compared the fur pluck and sticky paper techniques for the diagnosis of Myocoptes musculinus in naturally infested immunocompetent mice and evaluated the effect of mouse age and sampling site on the efficacy of fur plucks. We found that the sticky paper technique was more likely to detect fur mites than were fur plucks. Housing mice individually increased the incidence of false-negative fur pluck tests, whereas sensitivity was equivalent for preweanling and adult mice. The ventral abdomen was the most likely single sampling location to detect evidence of any stage of Myocoptes musculinus, but fur mite eggs were overrepresented on the neck. We found that the surface temperature of the murine neck surface was warmer than was the rump and therefore may represent a unique microenvironment for fur mite egg development. Given our findings, we recommend that group-housed adult or preweanling mice should be selected for Myocoptes musculinus evaluation and that the ventral abdomen should be sampled. When possible...

‣ Total IgE as a Serodiagnostic Marker to Aid Murine Fur Mite Detection

Roble, Gordon S; Boteler, William; Riedel, Elyn; Lipman, Neil S
Fonte: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Publicador: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.617336%
Mites of 3 genera—Myobia, Myocoptes, and Radfordia—continue to plague laboratory mouse facilities, even with use of stringent biosecurity measures. Mites often spread before diagnosis, predominantly because of detection difficulty. Current detection methods have suboptimal sensitivity, are time-consuming, and are costly. A sensitive serodiagnostic technique would facilitate detection and ease workload. We evaluated whether total IgE increases could serve as a serodiagnostic marker to identify mite infestations. Variables affecting total IgE levels including infestation duration, sex, age, mite species, soiled-bedding exposure, and ivermectin treatment were investigated in Swiss Webster mice. Strain- and pinworm-associated effects were examined by using C57BL/6 mice and Swiss Webster mice dually infested with Syphacia obvelata and Aspiculuris tetraptera, respectively. Mite infestations led to significant increases in IgE levels within 2 to 4 wk. Total IgE threshold levels and corresponding sensitivity and specificity values were determined along the continuum of a receiver-operating characteristic curve. A threshold of 81 ng/mL was chosen for Swiss Webster mice; values above this point should trigger screening by a secondary, more specific method. Sex-associated differences were not significant. Age...

‣ Comparison of a Fur Mite PCR Assay and the Tape Test for Initial and Posttreatment Diagnosis during a Natural Infection

Weiss, Erica E; Evans, Kristin D; Griffey, Stephen M
Fonte: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Publicador: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.734531%
Fur mites were diagnosed in a colony of mice at our research institution. In the current study, we compared the effectiveness of PCR and tape test in a small population of mice at the onset of diagnosis and throughout treatment. Samples were collected 1 d prior to treatment with permethrin impregnated cotton balls and 6 and 12 wk after treatment. PCR confirmed the presence of Myocoptes musculinus and Radfordia affinis or Myobia musculi, but tape test confirmed only the presence of Myocoptes spp. The results of the PCR and tape test agreed 97.2% of the time during active infection on day 1, but only 59.5% and 48.4% of results coincided at 6 and 12 wk after treatment, respectively. At 6 wk, 11 of the 37 samples were PCR-negative but tape-test–positive, compared with 9 of the 31 samples at 12 wk. Our results show that PCR is a reliable diagnostic method during active fur mite infection but that false-negative results are possible after treatment. Negative PCR results after treatment should be interpreted carefully, and a secondary diagnostic method should be considered.

‣ Safety and Efficacy of Topical Lime Sulfur in Mice Infested with Myocoptes musculinus

Wood, Jennifer S; Courtney, Cynthia L; Lieber, Karen A; Lee, Vanessa K
Fonte: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Publicador: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.172%
Current treatment options for murine fur mites have limitations in safety and efficacy. This study evaluated whether topical lime sulfur (LS) is an adjunct or alternative to traditional treatment options for Myocoptes musculinus. To evaluate the safety of topical LS, mice were dipped in a 3% LS solution at 34 and 41 d of age. Mice were observed daily for side effects and mortality, with blood work and necropsy at 42 d of age to evaluate for pathologic changes. To determine the efficacy of topical LS, postweanling mice infested with M. musculinus were treated with LS once weekly for 2 wk and then housed with uninfested sentinel mice for 4 wk. Weekly tape tests and postmortem tape tests and skin scrapings were performed on all mice. Treated postweanling mice had significantly lower Hgb levels and higher BUN levels than did control animals. In mite-infested mice, the number of positive cages at euthanasia was the same between treated and control animals. Although topical LS did not cause gross or microscopic changes to organ systems, it may cause clinicopathologic changes, and topical LS is not effective as a sole treatment for M. musculinus infestation of postweanling mice.

‣ Efficacy of Direct Detection of Pathogens in Naturally Infected Mice by Using a High-Density PCR Array

Henderson, Kenneth S; Perkins, Cheryl L; Havens, Richard B; Kelly, Mee-Jin E; Francis, Brian C; Dole, Vandana S; Shek, William R
Fonte: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Publicador: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
27.541162%
We used a high-density array of real-time PCR assays for commonly reported rodent infectious agents (PRIA) to test naturally infected index mice and sentinel mice exposed by contact and soiled-bedding transfer. PRIA detected 14 pathogens—including viruses, bacteria, fur mites, pinworms, and enteric protozoa—in 97.2% of 28 pooled fecal samples, fur–perianal swabs, and oral swabs from 4 cages containing a total of 10 index mice. Among these pathogens, PRIA (like conventional health monitoring methods) failed to detect Mycoplasma pulmonis, Pasteurella pneumotropica, and Giardia spp. in all of the 9 contact and 9 soiled-bedding sentinels. PRIA demonstrated murine adenovirus and Cryptosporidium and Spironucleus spp. in contact but not soiled-bedding sentinels and detected Helicobacter and pinworms in fewer than half of the soiled-bedding sentinels. Of the 4 species of Helicobacter that species-specific PCR assays identified in index mice, only H. ganmani was found in soiled-bedding and contact sentinels. PRIA detected all of the pathogens in sentinels that were identified by conventional methods. Myobia musculi was detected by PCR in index and sentinel mice but missed by conventional parasitologic examinations. In summary, PRIA reproducibly detected diverse pathogens in heavily pooled specimens collected noninvasively from infected index mice antemortem. The inability of PRIA and conventional health monitoring methods (that is...

‣ Evaluation of Diagnostic Methods for Myocoptes musculinus According to Age and Treatment Status of Mice (Mus musculus)

Rice, Kelly A; Albacarys, Lauren K; Pate, Kelly A Metcalf; Perkins, Cheryl; Henderson, Kenneth S; Watson, Julie
Fonte: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Publicador: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
28.860947%
Detecting and controlling murine fur mites continues to be challenging. Here we compared the efficacy of fur-pluck, cage PCR, and fur PCR testing of mice naturally infested with Myocoptes musculinus and make recommendations regarding the application of these diagnostic strategies in aged or treated mice. We compared all 3 diagnostic methods in groups of infested and noninfested control mice over time. For fur plucks, we used a scoring system to quantitatively compare mite infestations across ages. Mice that were 4 wk old had higher egg and mite scores than did older mice, with average scores at 4 wk corresponding to 40 to 100 individual fur mites and eggs per sample. Furthermore, 15% and 20% of samples from infested mice at 24 and 28 wk of age, respectively, lacked all fur mites and eggs. Cage PCR results varied as mice grew older. Fur PCR testing was the most sensitive and specific assay in untreated infested mice, particularly when mite densities were low. In addition, we compared fur-pluck and fur PCR tests for evaluating the efficacy of selamectin treatment. Two treatments with selamectin eliminated Myocoptes fur-mite infestations. At 8 wk after treatment, all fur-pluck samples were negative, but one-third of treated infested cages remained positive by fur PCR assay; at 16 wk after treatment...

‣ Combined Evaluation of Commonly Used Techniques, Including PCR, for Diagnosis of Mouse Fur Mites

Karlsson, Eleanor M; Pearson, Laura M; Kuzma, Kristen M; Burkholder, Tanya H
Fonte: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Publicador: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
37.93414%
Our study evaluated and compared the false-negative rates (FNR) of a wide array of fur-mite diagnostic tests, including 2 postmortem tests (pelt exam and sticky paper) and 3 antemortem tests (adhesive tape, fur pluck, and PCR). Past publications examining fur-mite diagnostic techniques primarily used paired comparisons, evaluating tests by their level of agreement with only one other test. However, different combinations or pairs of diagnostics are used in the different studies, making the results of these comparisons difficult to interpret across all available diagnostics. In the current study, mice from a conventionally maintained colony endemic for Myobia musculi were identified as positive based on at least one positive diagnostic test. From this pool of positive animals, the FNR of all tests were quantified. The PCR assay and the pelt exam performed the best, with 0% and 2% FNR respectively, whereas tape, fur-pluck, and sticky-paper tests showed 24%, 26%, and 36% FNR, respectively. Our study shows that for mice in a colony naturally infested with Myobia musculi, PCR testing can be used for reliable antemortem detection, and pelt exam performed by experienced examiners is reliable for postmortem detection.

‣ Einfluss einer allergischen Sensibilisierung und parasitären Infektion bei Müttern auf die allergen- und antigenspezifische Immunreaktivität der Neugeborenen; The Influence of Allergization and Parasite Infection of the Pregnant Women on the allergen-specific Immune Response of the Newborn

Mußler, Christina Maria
Fonte: Universidade de Tubinga Publicador: Universidade de Tubinga
Tipo: Dissertação
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
17.541162%
Der Einfluss von parasitären Infektionen während der Schwangerschaft auf die Reifung des fetalen Immunsystems ist bis heute nicht ausreichend verstanden. Bei Kindern von infizierten Müttern wird eine gesteigerte Empfänglichkeit für parasitäre Infektionen, eine höhere Parasitenlast und eine längere Infektionsdauer beobachtet. Zugleich scheint eine parasitäre Infektion der Mutter während der Schwangerschaft deren Kinder durch eine spezifische Immunsuppression und Toleranzinduktion vor schweren klinischen Symptomen nach Infektion im späteren Leben zu schützen. Des Weiteren deutet vieles daraufhin, dass eine parasitäre Infektion der Mutter, vor allem mit Helminthen, deren Kinder vor allergischen Erkrankungen bewahrt. Auch eine Allergie der Mutter beeinflusst die allergische Immunreaktivität der Kinder im späteren Leben, jedoch ist nicht bekannt, ob eine allergische Sensibilisierung der Mutter auch die Inzidenz und den Krankheitsverlauf von parasitären Infektionen bei deren Kindern beeinflusst. Die hier vorliegenden Untersuchungen sollten die allergen- und parasitenantigen¬spezifische zelluläre Immunantwort von Müttern und deren Neugeborenen in der Zentralregion der Republik Togo untersuchen. Mit Hilfe parasitologischer und serologischer Nachweisverfahren wurden der Infektionsstatus und die antigen- und allergen-spezifische Antikörperreaktivität der Mütter ermittelt. Aus peripherem Vollblut der Mütter und Nabelschnurblut der Neugeborenen wurden mononukleäre Blutzellen isoliert und mit Allergenen und Parasitenantigenen für 24...

‣ PCR Testing of a Ventilated Caging System to Detect Murine Fur Mites

Jensen, Eric S; Allen, Kenneth P; Henderson, Kenneth S; Szabo, Aniko; Thulin, Joseph D
Fonte: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Publicador: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
48.65394%
Rodents housed in microisolation caging are commonly monitored for infectious agents by the use of soiled bedding sentinels. This strategy relies on the successful transmission of rodent pathogens from the index rodents via soiled bedding to sentinel cages and the subsequent infection or colonization of sentinel rodents. When the prevalence of a pathogen is low or the target agent is not readily transmitted by soiled bedding, alternative testing methodologies should be used. Given the continued prevalence of institutions self-reporting murine fur mites and with the advent of a new sensitive and specific PCR assay for mites, we sought to determine whether the exhaust system of an individual ventilated caging (IVC) system could be used for monitoring the rack's rodent population for mites rather than relying on the responses of sentinels. We deployed single cages of mice (Mus musculus) that were known to be infested with either Radfordia affinis or Myobia musculi on a 70-cage rack, sampled the horizontal exhaust manifolds weekly, and used the new PCR assay to test these samples for mite DNA. We detected the presence of fur mites at a 94.1% probability of detection within 4 wk of placement. Therefore, we recommend swabbing and testing the shelf exhaust manifolds of IVC racks rather than relying on soiled-bedding sentinels as an indicator of the mite status of the rodents on that rack.

‣ Phylogenetic Analysis of Myobia musculi (Schranck, 1781) by Using the 18S Small Ribosomal Subunit Sequence

Feldman, Sanford H; Ntenda, Abraham M
Fonte: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Publicador: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
17.850609%
We used high-fidelity PCR to amplify 2 overlapping regions of the ribosomal gene complex from the rodent fur mite Myobia musculi. The amplicons encompassed a large portion of the mite's ribosomal gene complex spanning 3128 nucleotides containing the entire 18S rRNA, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1, 5.8S rRNA, ITS2, and a portion of the 5′-end of the 28S rRNA. M. musculi’s 179-nucleotide 5.8S rRNA nucleotide sequence was not conserved, so this region was identified by conservation of rRNA secondary structure. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenetic analyses were performed by using multiple sequence alignment consisting of 1524 nucleotides of M. musculi 18S rRNA and homologous sequences from 42 prostigmatid mites and the tick Dermacentor andersoni. The phylograms produced by both methods were in agreement regarding terminal, secondary, and some tertiary phylogenetic relationships among mites. Bayesian inference discriminated most infraordinal relationships between Eleutherengona and Parasitengona mites in the suborder Anystina. Basal relationships between suborders Anystina and Eupodina historically determined by comparing differences in anatomic characteristics were less well-supported by our molecular analysis. Our results recapitulated similar 18S rRNA sequence analyses recently reported. Our study supports M. musculi as belonging to the suborder Anystina...

‣ Evolution and functional morphology of ptychoidy in Ptyctima (Acari, Oribatida)

Schmelzle, Sebastian
Fonte: Universität Tübingen Publicador: Universität Tübingen
Tipo: Dissertation; info:eu-repo/semantics/doctoralThesis
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
17.734532%
Oribatida (Acari, Arachnida) are diverse and abundant in temperate forest litter. As particle feeding saprophages or mycophages, their food is of relatively low quality, which supposedly results in slow movement, prolonged generation time and reduced reproductive potential. Hence, oribatid mites developed a number of different defensive mechanisms. The most complex mechanical defensive mechanism is ptychoidy, where the animals can retract their legs and mouthparts into a secondary cavity in the idiosoma and encapsulate by deflecting the prodorsum. In this state the animals do not exhibit soft membrane but only—through biomineralization—hardened, thick cuticle, and are therefore well protected against many predators. Certain prerequisites have to be met for the evolution of ptychoidy: the coxisternum must be free from solid exoskeletal connections, i.e. embedded in soft membrane; the cuticle of the opisthosoma has to be hardened; the coxisternum must be foldable; and a system able to accommodate huge volume changes is needed. Despite this complexity, ptychoidy evolved three times independently, once in the Ptyctima and twice in the Enarthronota (Mesoplophoridae and Protoplophoridae). We used synchrotron X-ray microtomography (SRµCT)...

‣ Prevalence of fur mites (Acari: Atopomelidae) in non-human primates of Costa Rica

Troyo,Adriana; Solano,Mayra E; Calderón-Arguedas,Ólger; Chinchilla,Misael; Sánchez,Rónald; Gutiérrez-Espeleta,Gustavo A
Fonte: Revista de Biología Tropical Publicador: Revista de Biología Tropical
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/06/2009 Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
48.92378%
Parasites have been investigated for some New World primates; however, very little is known about ectoparasites and specifically fur mites. In this study, Alouatta palliata, Cebus capucinus, Saimiri oerstedii, and Ateles geoffroyi monkeys from different areas of Costa Rica were searched for fur mites. A total of 276 monkeys were evaluated, and 51 of them were positive for mites of the family Atopomelidae. Listrocarpus alouattae was identified on 22.3% of A. palliata; Listrocarpus capucinus on 12.8% of C. capucinus; and Listrocarpus costaricensis on 36.8% of S. oerstedii; No fur mites were found on A. geoffroyi. Sex was not considered a determinant of mite infestation, but prevalence was significantly higher in the Central Volcanic Mountain Range Conservation Area for L. alouattae (p=0.01) and in the Central Pacific Conservation Area for L. capucinus (p=0.002). These primate fur mites are highly host-specific. Differences in the geographical distribution may be due to monkey behavior and history, as well as to environmental conditions. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (1-2): 353-360. Epub 2009 June 30.