Página 1 dos resultados de 6 itens digitais encontrados em 0.001 segundos

‣ The Ethics of Food Production and Regulation of “Misbranding”

Hoffman, Selena
Fonte: Harvard University Publicador: Harvard University
Tipo: Paper (for course/seminar/workshop)
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
300.8796%
As consumers have become more conscious of the ethical implications of food choices, the food industry has capitalized on our concern by introducing labels that appeal to our moral sensibilities. Labels such as “free range” and “cage free” influence the purchasing decisions of consumers because these labels suggest production methods with fewer harmful ethical implications, whether with regard to animal welfare or environmental sustainability. In response to consumer demand for more ethical food choices, production method labeling has become widespread. Nevertheless—and despite pervasive regulation of other types of food labeling— oversight of production methods claims is virtually nonexistent. Thus, consumers rely on labels such as “free range” to make purchasing decisions, without knowing what “free range” really means. The misbranding provisions of FDA’s and USDA’s authorizing statutes grant the agencies the ability to prohibit claims that are “false and misleading in any particular.” Under these provisions, the agencies could regulate production method claims to protect American consumers who are concerned about the ethical implications of what they eat. This paper explores the challenges to using the misbranding provision to regulate labeling of production methods—and how the provision might be used to protect consumers from false and misleading production method claims.

‣ Contact Lens (Mis)Labeling as Misbranding and Overwarning

Delacourt, John T.
Fonte: Harvard University Publicador: Harvard University
Tipo: Paper (for course/seminar/workshop)
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
164.19611%
One of the most important functions of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is the administration of labeling requirements promulgated pursuant to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDCA). This function is especially important in the area of medical devices. Although consumers may use such devices on a routine basis, most lack both the scientific knowledge to adequately inform themselves of the risks of device usage and the resources to keep abreast of developments in the device field. But protecting consumers involves more than merely informing them of risks. The FDA has also sought to restrain its regulatory power in this area in order to provide device manufacturers with the flexibility needed to innovate and to ensure widespread device distribution. Any FDA decision in the device labeling context, therefore, inevitably involves the weighing of these two often contradictory goals.

‣ Who Shall Meet the Foe If Not She? Women’s Participation in the Movement Leading Up to the Federal Food and Drug Act of 1906, As Seen Through the Pages of Good Housekeeping

Diamond, Jenny A.
Fonte: Harvard University Publicador: Harvard University
Tipo: Paper (for course/seminar/workshop)
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
164.19611%
This paper examines women’s participation in the movement leading up to the Federal Food and Drug Act of 1906 through a close reading of Good Housekeeping magazine between the years 1885 and 1907. The piece offers a lengthy chronological overview of Good Housekeeping’s coverage of the problems of food adulteration and misbranding. Not only did the magazine campaign for state and national legislation, but it instituted its own certification system for pure foods as well. The paper also explores Good Housekeeping’s relationships with other actors in the pure food, drink, and drug movement, including women’s clubs, temperance advocates, and Harvey Wiley. Articles and editorials in Good Housekeeping illustrate various themes emphasized by women pure food reformers, such as moralism, faith in science, and the idea that pure food was uniquely a woman’s issue. This paper suggests that Good Housekeeping’s longstanding interest in the problems of pure food, drink, and drugs lends credence to historians who argue that women were a vital part of the campaign for a federal law from the very beginning.

‣ The FDA & The FTC: An Alphabet Soup Regulating The Misbranding Of Food

Gerhart, Nicole
Fonte: Harvard University Publicador: Harvard University
Tipo: Paper (for course/seminar/workshop)
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
400.8796%
This paper will first look at the historical development of the division of regulation of food labeling by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the regulation by food advertising by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Then the standards by which the agencies regulate misbranding will be compared, both generally and in regards to health claims specifically. Agency interaction will be emphasized.

‣ Fomentation About Fermentation: A Study on Ingredient Labeling on Alcoholic Beverages

Myers, Jenna
Fonte: Harvard University Publicador: Harvard University
Tipo: Paper (for course/seminar/workshop)
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
164.19611%
Since the creation of the Federal Food and Drug law in 1906 up until a district court decision in 1976, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) shared concurrent jurisdiction with the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms (BATF) over both the adulteration and misbranding (labeling) of alcoholic beverages. As a policy matter, the FDA deferred the regulation of alcoholic beverages labeling to the BATF in order to avoid duplication, as long as the regulations were consistent with the food labeling requirements of the Food, Drugs and Cosmetics Act. However, as a result of a District court ruling in 1976, the BATF now possesses exclusive jurisdiction over the labeling of alcoholic beverages under the Federal Alcohol Administration Act. This has led to the some peculiar results and a confusing regulatory scheme. For instance, the FDA requires affirmative ingredient and nutritional labeling of all “food and drinks†within its jurisdictional boundaries, whereas the BATF does not require ingredient labeling requirements for any alcoholic beverages within its jurisdictional boundaries and still follows the mandate of an alcohol labeling law that dates back to the enactment of the Federal Administration Act in 1935. This has resulted in a lack of consumer information regarding the ingredients and contents in alcoholic beverages...

‣ First Amendment Scrutiny of FDA'S Fight Against Misbranding: Placing Labeling on the Spectrum of Speech

Weissman, Kenneth I.
Fonte: Harvard University Publicador: Harvard University
Tipo: Paper (for course/seminar/workshop)
Português
Relevância na Pesquisa
288.26965%
In order to further the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) mission of "assur[ing] that the products it regulates are safe and truthfully labeled," the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) gives FDA the power to enforce prohibitions on labeling that causes a food, drug, cosmetic, or medical device to be misbranded. The FD&C Act defines labeling as "all labels and other written, printed, or graphic matter (1) upon any article or any of its containers or wrappers, or (2) accompanying such article." Because of the expansive nature of this definition, independently written pamphlets, newspapers, and books that accompany products covered by the FD&C Act constitute labeling in certain circumstances. This exacerbates the tension between the First Amendment's free speech guarantee and FDA's mandate, and raises the question of how courts should scrutinize FDA's ability to seize or enjoin the sale of misleading labeling. The importance of both the Free Speech Clause and the protection of consumers makes this a difficult issue to resolve, and as of yet, "no case has squarely confronted the issue."